Inside Details On Jon Jones Being Suspended After Trying To Take Cialis

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Jon Jones

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) uploaded their decision in the Jon Jones arbitration case in its entirety in PDF format. The document explains that Jones, lawyer Howard Jacobs and agent Malki Kawa tried to make a case full of holes.

In June, Jones was having dinner with teammate Eric Blasich when Blasich told Jones that that he had been taking what he said was Cialis, the brand name for the erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil. Jones, who had been taking Viagra (sildenafil) understood the drugs to be similar and asked Blasich to give him a Cialis. Blasich did just that and Jones took one after dinner.

As it turns out, what Blasich had given Jones was a substance he had ordered from from a website called “All American Peptides” without a prescription. The website is currently offline but an archive of their page for tadalafi makes it clear it was not Cialis:

“This Product is for CHEMICAL RESEARCH USE ONLY. NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION/USE. WARNING: If product is ingested accidently contact Poison Control.“

“This product is not a drug, food, or cosmetic and should not be misbranded, misused or mislabelled (sic) as a drug, food or cosmetic.“

The samples sent from Jones and the ones the USADA ordered from the website tested positive for clomiphene and letrozole, the drugs Jones tested positive for, but also tamoxifen, a similar banned substance that didn’t come up in his tests.

The reason Jones was hit with the maximum punishment of one year is because of a lack of due diligence on Jones’s part. Arbitrators felt Jones asked a new teammate for a prescription erectile dysfunction medication almost out of the blue (Blasich talking about it doesn’t mean he’s offering it). Then he took an unmarked pill from someone he barely knew in spite of being a drug tested athlete.

Also, Jones didn’t declare Cialis on any of his paperwork filed with the USADA. Fighters are required to disclose every medication and supplement they are on so they cannot test positive for something and deny ever taking the drug. There was also concern over Tamoxifen not being found in his drug test, but the dosages in the capsules were inconsistent enough to explain that.

Here is the summarized decision of the arbitrators;

On the evidence before the Panel, the Applicant is not a drug cheat. He did not know that the tablet he took contained prohibited substances or that those substances had the capacity to enhance sporting performance. However by his imprudent use of what he pungently referred to as a “dick pill” he has not only lost a year of his career but an estimated nine million dollars. This outcome which he admits to be a wake-up call for him should serve as a warning to all others who participate in the same sport.

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